History of the Challenger: 300-350

Challenger 300 

In 1999, Bombardier announced plans for an aircraft they called the Continental, which would be certified in 2003 as the Challenger 300. The eight-passenger Challenger 300 was designed with the goal of having direct operating costs that are among the lowest in the super mid category. It comes equipped with a supercritical wing and standard winglets that reduce drag by approximately 17 percent.

The Challenger 300, equipped with two Honeywell HTF7000 engines, has a normal cruise speed of 459 knots, a range of 3,065 nautical miles, a climb rate of 4,240 feet per minute, and requires 4,689 feet of runway to takeoff and 2,927 feet to land.

 

Challenger 350

The Challenger 350, which entered into service in 2014, comes equipped with improved Honeywell engines that improve takeoff thrust, a strengthened wing with a longer wingspan, and an upgraded interior. Its winglets are improved, as well, reducing drag even further.

The Challenger 350, equipped with two Honeywell HTF7350 engines, has a normal cruise speed of 459 knots, a range of 3,250 nautical miles, a climb rate of 4,240 feet per minute, and requires 4,732 feet of runway to takeoff and 2,941 feet to land.

By | 2017-11-10T10:48:59+00:00 November 2nd, 2017|0 Comments

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